Catholic Tradition News Letter B20: Holy Eucharist, Fifth Sunday after Easter, St Paschal Baylon

Vol 13 Issue 20 ~ Editor: Rev. Fr. Courtney Edward
KrierMay 16, 2020 ~ Saint John Nepomucene, opn!

1.      What is the Holy Eucharist
2.      Fifth Sunday after Easter
3.      Saint Paschal Baylon
4.      Family and Marriage
5.      Articles and notices
Dear Reader:

The last several weeks have brought up many topics that have extended my commentary and I have neglected to introduce the next book that is already being published in sections, Good Morning Boys and Girls. Providing a section for the Family I thought it would be good to have these sermon/stories for our fathers and mothers to read to their children. It would not only provide—and it is providential since I had planned it without knowing the State would shut down schools—an opportunity for our parents to present topics that teach the faith in a practical manner, but at the same time read it to their children so the children could hear a sermon without it sounding like a sermon, just a short entertaining story. In many large parishes there would be a Children’s Mass where the priest would give a sermon directed more toward their age groups and topics surrounding their lives. It may make us nervous now to hear such expressions as a Children’s Mass now that the Conciliar Church has transformed the expression into one with the experiences of seeing a pedophile having all the children around him at the table while they parody their Novus Ordo with touches and hugs and balloons and clowns and acrobats along with songs and dances that scandalize their own liberal progressive members. It must be clear that the Children’s Mass, as it was understood previous to Vatican II, was one which saw the children well-behaved during a Mass (usually monitored by the Religious Sisters) that was no different than any other Mass except, as I mentioned, the sermon. It was the same for places where there was a Spanish Mass scheduled, or a German Mass, or a French Mass—everything was the same except for the sermon that was preached in the language indicated. It should be so today but too many have incorporated the Novus Ordo meaning to Catholic expressions. This is one reason for reading Catholic material written prior to Vatican II that uses Catholic terminology in a Catholic sense and for our children also to hear it. Unfortunately too much of so-called present day Catholic writing translates Catholic wording according to the Conciliarists and when someone uses a Catholic expression they are labeled as Novus Ordo or Modernist—without justification, only ignorance. For many it legitimizes the Conciliar Church by giving them the right to determine how we as Catholics can speak and write by somehow saying we cannot use these terms. Hopefully priests are explaining the Catholic understanding of the terminology without eliminating the terminology or surrendering it to the Conciliarists.

With the children home and away from the godless and immoral public schools, I pray our parents are taking the time to reestablish themselves as the primary educators in the lives of their children, teaching them the proper grade level material and not allowing them to fall behind in their academic formation. It can be a wonderful time to present the material in a Catholic manner without the indoctrination the public schools inject so they can see that History is History and Natural Science is Natural Science and English grammar is exact so that those who can read are reading what the writer intends them read—not an interpretation or guess like a foreign language. It will also show the children that even if the state and school system fail them like right now, you, as parents, are still there to educate and support them. To help, then, I hope the sermon/stories will be of assistance. May our Lady, Seat of Wisdom, and Saint Joseph, the Carpenter, aid you.

As always, enjoy the readings provided for your benefit.—The Editor

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WHAT IS THE HOLY EUCHARIST

By Rev. Courtney Edward Krier

PART II

Institution

The Institution of the Holy Eucharist

Here, also, two aspects should be considered. First, that it indicates something new is beginning that is different from the past. If the washing of feet was already accomplished before sitting at table, having the guests rise from the table indicates they have already completed eating the meal—here, the Passover meal. But washing the feet again after indicates either the meal will begin again, or some other significance is implied, and this can be understood in the exchange between Jesus Christ and Peter: 

And Peter saith to him: Lord, dost thou wash my feet? Jesus answered, and said to him: What I do thou knowest not now; but thou shalt know hereafter. Peter saith to him: Thou shalt never wash my feet. Jesus answered him: If I wash thee not, thou shalt have no part with me. Simon Peter saith to him: Lord, not only my feet, but also my hands and my head. Jesus saith to him: He that is washed, needeth not but to wash his feet, but is clean wholly. And you are clean, but not all. (John 13:6-10)

Jesus Christ was setting the Apostles aside for the priesthood of the New Testament, as seen in the Book of Numbers:  Take the Levites out of the midst of the children of Israel, and thou shalt purify them, according to this rite: Let them be sprinkled with the water of purification (Num. 8:6-7) This is confirmed by His words afterwards: Amen, amen I say to you, he that receiveth whomsoever I send, receiveth me; and he that receiveth me, receiveth him that sent me. (John 13:20) And it corresponds to the renewal of the words of Christ to His Apostles: He said therefore to them again: Peace be to you. As the Father hath sent me, I also send you. (John 20:21; cf. Matt. 28:19 and Mark 16:15)

As Christ instituted the New Testament priesthood during the Institution of the Holy Eucharist, which is the First Mass, it is also that the priesthood is bestowed during the Holy Mass with all the ceremonies expressing the priest is offering Christ’s Body and Blood as the sacrifice of the New Covenant: Do this for a commemoration of me. (Luke 22:19; cf. 1 Cor. 11: 24) With these rites Christ now takes the prepared unleavened bread. One can turn to Meagher for an explanation:

Lying between it [the chalice] and the edge of the table was the silver plate holding the half cake of unleaven bread which had been hidden the Aphikoman still covered with a linen cloth. These were not partaken till the master of the feast had explained the whole ceremonial of the Passover, and we suppose the Lord pointed out their mystic meanings.

The Aphikoman, “The heavenly bread or manna,” of every Passover, reminded them of the desert manna on which their fathers had lived for forty years, and that was the fondest memory of the nation. “As Moses brought down manna so the Messiah would bring down a more wonderful food,” [Edersheim, Life of Christ, I. 176.] “God made manna to descend for them in which was all manner of tastes. The young tasted bread, the old honey, and the children oil.” [Talmud explained by Lightfoot, Hor. Heb. iii. 304.] Teachings had come down from the prophets that when the Messiah came he would repeat the wonders of the manna. The Rabbis taught “As the first Saviour, Moses, the deliverer from Egyptian bondage, caused manna to fall from heaven for Israel, so the second Saviour, the Messiah, will also cause manna to descend for them once more, for it is written, “There will be abundance of grain in the land.” [Nork, 174] Thus they interpreted the prophecies of the Eucharist the only-begotten Son was about to fulfil in the Aphikoman and change the shadow into the reality. [See Zanolini, Disputat de Festis Judæorum, Benedict XIV. De Festis Dom. N. Jesus Christi et B. M. Virgin, col. 144, 659, Migne Edition.]

The Passover rite in the days of Christ, still observed by strict Jews of the Orient, is as follows. The master of the feast makes a sign to the boy holding the hidden plate with the Aphikoman, who brings it to him. The master uncovers it, breaks off a piece which he eats. Then he breaks off a piece for each and lays it on the guest’s left palm. The guests take the pieces of bread between thumb and index finger and put them in their mouths. (423-24)

In Scripture one reads:

Saint Matthew

And whilst they were at supper, Jesus took bread, and blessed, and broke: and gave to his disciples, and said: Take ye, and eat. This is my body. (Matt. 26:26)

Saint Mark

And whilst they were eating, Jesus took bread; and blessing, broke, and gave to them, and said: Take ye. This is my body. (Mark 14:22)

Saint Luke

And taking bread, he gave thanks, and brake; and gave to them, saying: This is my body, which is given for you. Do this for a commemoration of me. (Luke 22:19)

Saint Paul:

The Lord Jesus, the same night in which he was betrayed, took bread. And giving thanks, broke, and said: Take ye, and eat: this is my body, which shall be delivered for you: this do for the commemoration of me. (1 Cor. 11:23-24)

Then Christ takes the prepared Chalice. Meagher explains this cup as follows:

Melchisedech’s chalice, the cos-ha-beraehali, [Farrar, ii. 291] “The cup of blessing,” the fourth cup of wine mixed with water of the Jewish ceremonial, covered with a napkin, stands before the Messiah. . . .

The master drinks the wine from the chalice, then hands it around to the guests, who all drink from it. They thus take the bread and wine in memory of Noe, Melchisedech and the proposition bread and wine of the Temple. This ends the feast, and they are forbidden to eat or drink anything after this, even a dessert is forbidden. The Gospel narrative and Consecration words according to the Roman rite show that Christ carefully followed the Jewish custom and the Passover rule.

At Passover the master of the feast took his large chalice in his hands, raised it up with a thanksgiving prayer, drank from it, and passed it round to the guests, as a loving cup and a bond of friendship between them. And they all drank as a sign of esteem, friendship, and love of the master at whose hospitable table they had celebrated the Passover. The Gospel and the Latin Rite show us that Christ followed this Jewish custom. (424-25)

In Scripture one reads:

Saint Matthew:

And taking the chalice, he gave thanks, and gave to them, saying: Drink ye all of this. For this is my blood of the new testament, which shall be shed for many unto remission of sins. (Matt. 26:27-28)

Saint Mark

And having taken the chalice, giving thanks, he gave it to them. And they all drank of it. And he said to them: This is my blood of the new testament, which shall be shed for many. (Mark 14: 23-24)

Saint Luke

In like manner the chalice also, after he had supped, saying: This is the chalice, the new testament in my blood, which shall be shed for you. (Luke 22:20)

Saint Paul

In like manner also the chalice, after he had supped, saying: This chalice is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as often as you shall drink, for the commemoration of me. (1 Cor. 11: 25)

Croegaert points to the reality of a sacrifice being offered by Jesus Christ in the institution of the Holy Eucharist:

The Jews were cognizant of offerings made for sin and knew that blood cannot remit sins unless it is offered in sacrifice. So, too, when the Lord said that his body was given for the Apostles and his blood shed for many for the remission of sins, he was clearly speaking of a sacrifice. It is unimportant whether the participles translated “given” and “shed” ( or “poured out”) are translated in the present or (as in the Vulgate account of the consecration of the blood) in the future: if they are translated in the present, the sacrificial nature of the eucharistic rite is made obvious, if as future, they emphasize the sacrificial character of the cross and the extremely close links by which the eucharistic rite is bound to it.

In consecrating bread and wine separately, Christ showed forth the separation which was to occur on the cross. Indeed, to separate the blood from the body is to kill. The sacrifice in which the blood was shed is, of course, here represented symbolically, but the Eucharist is not merely a symbol or representation: this rite is sacramental—not only tangible, but also efficacious, making that which it signifies actually present. (cf. op. cit. 19)

Here one must look at the scene:

1)      It was after the Passover meal, so all that pertained to the Passover sacrifice was accomplished:

a)      Luke 22: 20: In like manner the chalice also, after he had supped, . . .

b)      John 13:2: And when supper was done, .  . .

c)      1 Cor. 11:25: In like manner also the chalice, after he had supped, . . .

Mentioning this detail is to take note it was not part of the Passover ritual. Matthew and Mark introduce the institution during the Supper—but this is easily understood as the period from when they entered the Cenacle until they departed. Saint Thomas writes, in commenting on verse 26,

Above, the Evangelist related the celebration of the Pasch; here, the institution of the Sacrament of the altar is related. And firstly, the Sacrament is instituted; and secondly, the future scandalizing of the disciples is foretold, where it is said, Then Jesus saith to them: All you shall be scandalized. Firstly, He does two things. The paschal Sacrament is instituted; and secondly, a hymn of thanksgiving is sung, where it is said, And a hymn being said, they went out unto mount Olivet. And about the first point, the Evangelist does two things. Firstly, the institution of the Sacrament under the species of bread is related; secondly, the institution of the Sacrament under the species of wine is related , where it is said, And taking the chalice, he gave thanks, etc. About the first point, he firstly mentions Christ’s actions; and secondly, he mentions Christ’s words, where it is said, Take ye and eat. This is my body. Regarding His actions, five things ought to be noted. Firstly, the time is related; secondly, the matter is indicated; thirdly, the blessing is related; fourthly, the breaking is related; and fifthly, the communication, or distribution is related. The time is mentioned when he says, And whilst they were at supper, etc., meaning during their supper, meaning while they were eating. (Com. On Matthew’s Gospel, 858)

2)      The Passover meal consisted of a ritually sacrificed lamb and rituals. The institution of the Holy Eucharist had to have a greater significance and would have consisted of rituals, though not noted—as the Passover rituals were also not noted in detail—but found in the rituals handed down by the Apostles and still preserved in holy Mass.

a)      From the command to observe the Passover (Scriptural) to the ritual of the Passover (Tradition) one sees a prescribed ritual universally followed by all in Jerusalem for the Passover before the destruction of the Temple.

b)      Saint John, in the Apocalypse, provides an oversight of a ritual: I was in the spirit on the Lord’s day . . . (Apoc. 1:10; cf. 1:12ff, 4:1ff, and 5:1ff.) Candles, book open, vestments, incense, Sanctus announcing Canon of Mass, et cetera.

c)      Exodus, chapters 25-30 describe the making and placing of the vestments, lamps, incense and ark but no details of the ritual.

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The Sunday Sermons of the Great Fathers

M. F. Toal

THE GOSPEL OF THE SUNDAY

John xvi. 23-30

At that time: Jesus said to his disciples: Amen, amen, I say to you: if you ask the Father anything in my name, he will give it to you. Hitherto you have not asked anything in my name. Ask, and you shall receive; that your joy may be made full.

These things I have spoken to you in proverbs. The hour cometh, when I will no more speak to you in proverbs, but will shew you plainly of the Father. In that day you shall ask in my name; and I say not to you that I will ask the Father for you: For the Father himself loveth you, because you have loved me, and have believed that I came out from God. I came forth from the Father, and am come into the world: again I leave the world, and I go to the Father.

His disciples say to him: Behold, now thou speakest plainly, and speakest no proverb. Now we know that thou knowest all things, and thou needest not that any man should ask thee. By this we believe that thou camest forth from God.

EXPOSITION FROM THE CATENA AUREA

V. 28. I came forth from the Father, and am come into the world . . .

AUGUSTINE, Tr. in John, 102, 6: He came forth from the Father, because He is of the substance of the Father. He came into this world, for He manifested His Body (which He took from the Virgin) to the world. He left the world by means of a bodily departure, yet not depriving the world of the support of His Presence: for coming forth from the Father He so came to the world that He at the same time departed not from His Father (101, 4). But we read that Our Lord Jesus Christ was both asked questions and prayed to. For about to ascend into heaven He was asked by His Disciples when He would restore the kingdom of Israel? In heaven He was besought by Stephen to receive his spirit (Acts vii. 58). And who will venture to say that while yet mortal He might be besought, but not when immortal? I believe therefore that what He just said: And in that day you shall not ask me anything (v. 23), does not refer to the time of His Resurrection, but to that time when we shall see him as he is (I John iii). This vision belongs, not to His temporal life, but to the eternal, wherein we shall ask for nothing (101, 6), seek for nothing; for there shall remain nothing to be desired, nothing hidden to be revealed.

ALCUIN: Therefore He says: In the world that is to come you shall not ask me anything, but now, while you linger in this pilgrimage of suffering, if you ask the Father for anything, He will give it to you. Accordingly, he continues and says: Amen, amen, I say to you; if you ask the Father anything in my name, He will give it to you.

AUGUSTINE, Tr. 102 in John 2: That He says anything is not to be understood as meaning anything whatsoever, but something which has to do with the obtaining of the life of the blessed; for what is asked for to the hindering of our salvation is not asked for in the Name of the Saviour. For when He says, In my name, we must understand, not the sound of the letters and syllables, but what is truly and correctly signified by the sound.

Accordingly, he who believes regarding Christ that which is not to be thought of concerning the Only Son of God, does not ask in His Name. But he who believes that which is to be held regarding Him, he truly asks in His Name, and shall receive what he is seeking; if he seeks what is not opposed to his own eternal welfare. And he shall receive it when it is fitting that He shall receive it. For there are things which while not denied are yet withheld: to be given in a fitting time.

Likewise we should correctly understand the words: He will give it to you, so that by them those favours are to be understood which relate expressly to those who ask. All the sanctified are beyond doubt heard, when they pray, not for anyone, but for themselves; for it was not said simply, that He will give, but that, He will give to you.

(102, 2). What follows: Hitherto you have not asked anything in my name, may be understood in two ways. Either that you have not asked in My name, because you have not known the Name as it is to be known, or because you have not asked anything; since in comparison with that which you ought to have asked for, that must be regarded as nothing for which you did ask. Therefore, that they may ask in His Name, not for what is nothing, but for the fulness of delight, He goes on: Ask, and you shall receive; that your joy may be full. This saying: the fulness of joy: means spiritual not carnal joy; and it will be full when it is so great that nothing can be added to it.

AUGUSTINE, De Trin. I, 2: This is the fulness of our joy, than which there is nothing greater: to enjoy God in the Trinity; in Whose likeness we are made.

AUGUSTINE, Tr. 102 in John 2: Whatsoever therefore that is asked for which relates to the attainment of this Joy must be asked for in the Name of Christ. The divine mercy shall never disappoint the just who persevere in the desire of that good. Whatsoever else is asked for, nothing is asked for; not that it is really nothing, but that in comparison with this so great joy it is as nothing. Then follows: These things I have spoken to you in proverbs. The hour cometh, when I will no more speak to you in proverbs. I would say (102, 3) that the hour of which He is here speaking must be understood of the world to come; when we shall behold Him clearly, face to face, as the Apostle says; and that the words: These things I have spoken to you in proverbs, relate to what was later said by the Apostle: We see now through a glass in a dark manner (I Cor. xiii. 12). I will show you plainly of the Father; for the Father shall be seen through the Son. Neither doth anyone know the Father, but the Son, and he to whom it shall please the Son to reveal him.

GREGORY, Morals 30, 8: He declares that He will speak openly to us concerning the Father; for by the revelation of His own majesty He will show us both the manner in which He came forth, being Equal to Him that begot Him, and the manner in which the Holy Spirit proceeds from Them Both.

AUGUSTINE, in John; as above: But this meaning appears to hamper what follows: In that day you shall ask in my name: for in the world to come what shall we ask for, since our desire is already satisfied with good things (Ps. cii. 5)? For to ask for anything is a sign of need. (102, 4). It remains therefore that Jesus is to be understood as about to change His Disciples from being carnal or animal-minded into spiritual men. A carnal minded man whatever he shall hear concerning the nature of God will understand it in a bodily sense; as he cannot understand It as being other than body (though vast, or immense, or shining, or as beautiful). And so whatever words of wisdom are spoken regarding this incorporeal and unchangeable Substance are proverbs to him; not that he regards them as proverbs, but he thinks of them in the manner of those who are wont to hear proverbs: as not understanding them.

But when he has become spiritual minded he begins to see into all things; though in this life he sees as through a glass, and only in part; yet he perceives through no bodily sense, through no imaginative concept, but by means of a most certain knowledge of his mind understands that God is not body but spirit. And the son speaking so plainly of the Father, it is evident that He who speaks is of the same Substance. Now they who pray, pray in His Name, for by the sound of that Name they mean only the Reality called by this Name. They can think within them that Our Lord Jesus Christ as man intercedes for us, and as God, together with the Father, receives our prayer. I think He implies this when He says: And I say not to you, that I will ask the father for you. Only the eye of a mind that is spiritual can rise to see how it is the son will not ask the father, but that father and son together receive the prayers of those who pray to them.

V. 29. His disciples say to him: behold now thou speakest plainly . . .

CHRYSOSTOM, as above: Because this especially breathed new life into them: that they were friends of the Father: they thereupon declare they are certain that He knows all things. Now, they say, thou speakest plainly, and speakest no proverb. AUGUSTINE, 103: But since that hour in which He shall speak to them without proverbs was yet to come, and only promised, why do they say this, if not because the things He knows are to them, who understand them not, still as proverbs; and so little do they understand that they not even see that they do not understand?

V. 30. Now we know that thou knowest all things . . .

CHRYSOSTOM, Hom. 78, 2: Since His words answer that which was in their minds, they continue: Now we know that thou knowest all things. See how imperfect they were; after seeing so many and such great wonders, they exclaim: Now we know . . . saying it too as though conferring a reward on Him. And thou needest not that any man should ask thee; that is, without hearing from us Thou dost know what troubles us, and Thou hast given peace to our hearts, telling us that the Father loves us.

AUGUSTINE, 103, 2: What does it mean that they should say to Him Whom they believed knew all things: Thou needest not that any man should ask thee, when they should rather have said: Thou needest not to ask any man? Both of which things in fact took place; namely, that the Lord both asked questions, and was asked them. But this is readily explained: for this was for the benefit, not of Him, but of them, whom He questions and by whom He was Himself questioned. For He questioned them, not that He might learn from them, but rather that He might teach them; and they who questioned Him, desiring to learn something from Him, had need to learn certain things from Him Who knew all things. Neither did He need to learn, by their question, that which each wished to learn from Him; for before He was questioned He had known the wish of the questioner. To foreknow the thoughts of men was no great thing for the Lord, but to the newborn (in Christ) it was a great wonder; who go on to add: By this we believe that thou camest forth from God.

HILARY, The Trinity, 6; 34: Because of this they believe that He has come forth from God, namely: that He does the things which only God may do. For when the Lord had said that He both came forth from God, and that, from the Father He had come into this world, they showed no astonishment at this; for they had frequently heard it before. Accordingly they do not add: And have come from the Father into the world. For they knew already that He was sent by God. But they did not yet know that He came forth from the Father.

Understanding now, because of these words, they then for the first time, when they declare that He now spoke to them without proverbs, begin to tum their minds towards this ineffable mystery of the birth of the Son (par. 35). For not after the manner of a human bringing-forth is God born of God; His is rather a coming forth from God than a bringing forth. He is One from the One; not a portion, not a falling away; it is not a diminution, not an offshoot, not a stretching forth, not an infirmity, but the birth of a living substance from a living substance. It is God coming forth from God; not a creature elected to the name of God. He did not, from nothing, begin to be; but came forth from What was forever; and to have come forth means birth, not beginning.

AUGUSTINE, 103, 2: Lastly He reminds them of their age with regard to the inward man: that it was as yet young and tender.

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MAY 17

St. Paschal Baylon, Confessor

1. St. Paschal was born of deeply religious parents, in Spain, May 16, 1540. At an early age the boy gave evidence of great piety, especially in his devotion to the Holy Eucharist. His greatest joy was to be carried by his mother to Mass. Before he could walk, he sometimes crawled on all fours to the Church and climbed up to the altar in order to be near the Savior. At seven he began herding his father’s sheep and, since he could not afford to go to school, he carried a book to the pasture and spent his leisure hours at learning to read and write. Eventually the boy was able to read books; but then, he was sent to work away from home, where he had to contend with the bad example of fellow shepherds. Meanwhile, Paschal felt drawn to the religious state. When he was eighteen he applied for admission to a Franciscan monastery near Valencia. He was rejected and sent to tend the sheep of a neighbor. This was done, evidently, to try his vocation, for in 1564, he was given the habit of a brother. He strove to live a perfect, holy life and continued his boyhood devotion to Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. He died on May 17, 1592; he was beatified in 1618, was canonized in 1690, and, in 1897 Pope Leo XIII declared him the heavenly patron of all Eucharistic societies.

2. “I give thee praise that thou hast hidden all this from the wise and the prudent, and revealed it to little children” (Matt. 11:25). It seems that God always chooses little, unlikely instruments to accomplish great works. He wants to show that He is the almighty Lord, so that no man shall boast before Him. “Lifting up the poor from the dust he lay in, raising the beggar out of his dung-hill, to find him a place among the princes. . .” (Ps. 112:7). Again, “He has exalted the lowly” (Magnificat; Luke 1:52). The poor, unlettered shepherd bore patiently the trial of being refused the religious habit and having to work at his humble occupation for six more years. Likewise, as a religious, he found ample occasion for the exercise of humility under difficult commands and correction, not to mention unkind suspicions and accusations. But his calm, humble submissiveness was rewarded with heavenly favors. For example, utterly ignorant of theological learning, he could grasp the deepest mysteries of faith and give opinions about dogmatic treatises, much to the astonishment of the greatest theologians of his time. Besides, he enjoyed the gift of prophecy; he could read hearts; he obtained cures. Greatest of his gifts was the grace of prayer. In his shepherd days he lived a hermit’s life, sanctified by prayer; he beheld divine truths in moments of ecstasy. Cold weather, ice, and snow did not prevent him from spending night hours in contemplation. Thus did God exalt the humble Brother. When, in view of his talents, superiors suggested that he study for the priesthood, Paschal expressed his desire to remain as he was, feeling himself, like St. Francis, unworthy of the priestly dignity.

“O God, who didst adorn Thy blessed confessor Paschal with a marvelous love for the sacred mysteries of Thy body and blood . . .” (Collect). Even before he entered the monastery, Paschal’s heart glowed with love for the Eucharistic Lord. Now, as doorkeeper, he found opportunity for frequent visits to the church. Interruptions of duty failed to interrupt his spirit of recollection and adoration. Very early in the morning, he could be found kneeling for hours, with outstretched arms, before the tabernacle. Occasionally he was so powerfully drawn to contemplation of the Eucharistic mystery that his body rose from the floor. This same spirit prompted him, too, to serve as many as eight Holy Masses in one morning. It was this constant, loving realization of the Mystery of Love that supported the Saint at all times and in all circumstances. On one occasion, when he was traveling to a monastery in France, Huguenots mistreated and reviled him and even threw stones at him. When he begged food, people suspected him of being a spy, beat him, and then jailed him. This appeared to be the end for him, but, freed miraculously, he continued his journey, enduring new insults on the way.

Finally, some Huguenots resorted to different tactics. They questioned: “Do you believe that God is present in the Sacrament that you consecrate at Mass?” Brother replied: “Yes, I do believe that; and I loudly proclaim that God is truly and substantially present under the appearance of bread.” More mistreatment followed, and, no doubt, Paschal’s desire to become a martyr of the Eucharist would have been fulfilled, had not God wonderfully protected him. All the stones aimed at his head missed their mark; only one struck his left shoulder and crushed the bones, leaving him crippled for life. After two months he reached his monastery, still disappointed at not having been called upon to give his life for his faith in the divine presence. It is claimed that when he lay as a corpse before the altar, he opened his eyes for a moment at the consecration, to adore His sacrificed Lord for a last time. St. Paschal’s strong faith in, and love for the Holy Eucharist should be an inspiration to all.

3. From his fervent devotion to the Eucharistic Savior, St. Paschal gained perfection of virtue; complete freedom from all sin; love for poverty; virginity, chastity; humility, renunciation and prayer. His life showed forth perfect love of God and neighbor. “Tell me with whom you associate, and I will tell you who you are.” Do not we have the same Savior in the tabernacle, in the Holy Sacrifice, in Holy Communion? And yet—!

The Church possesses no greater, holier, or more wonderful treasure than the Blessed Sacrament. In it, she has the most remarkable, the greatest gift of God—God Himself, the source and author of all grace and holiness—Jesus Christ. If thou didst know the Gift of God! (cf. John 4: 10).

Collect: O God, who didst adorn Thy blessed confessor Paschal with a marvelous love for the sacred mysteries of Thy body and blood, grant us this favor: that we may find the same spiritual fulfillment as he found in this divine banquet. Amen. (Benedict Baur)

_____________________

Good Morning,

Boys and Girls!

            REV. THOMAS J. HOSTY, M.A., S.T.B.

(1952)

GOD’S HOME

GOOD MORNING, BOYS AND GIRLS!

The last time I spoke to you, I spent quite a bit of time in describing God’s jail to you. I hope you’ll never forget what a terrible place it is. I pray every day, too, that none of us will ever go there. But as long as I told you about God’s jail, I think that it’s only fair to tell you about God’s home. Do you know why? Because He has invited every one of us to be His guests there, after we die. And we’re not invited for just a couple of days, or for a week or two. We’re invited to stay there forever!

I suppose there isn’t a single one here this morning, who doesn’t know the name of God’s home. Just to make sure, though, let me ask one of you what you think God’s home is.

No, it isn’t the church. It’s true, however, that He does stay there, in the tabernacle, under what looks like a little piece of bread. But the church isn’t His real home. In His real home, He isn’t hiding under the appearance of bread or wine. You can see Him the way He actually looks.

I’ll give you a chance to make another guess. What or where is God’s home?

No, it isn’t Nazareth, either—but you’re getting a lot closer to the truth. I admit that Nazareth was our Lord’s home for a while, when He lived on this earth. But after He left this earth, He left Nazareth, too. When I speak of God’s home, I mean the place where God lives, and is actually seen and worshiped by all the angels and saints. To put it more simply still, I mean the place where God lives forever.

I knew if I gave you enough hints, you’d all know the answer. Yes, God’s true home is the place we call heaven.

Boys and girls, heaven is so wonderful a place that I can hardly begin to describe it, but I’ll make an effort, anyway. Try to picture all the beautiful things you have seen in your lifetime. Maybe, on your vacation, you were lucky enough to visit the Grand Canyon or the Rocky Mountains or Niagara Falls, In case you haven’t been fortunate enough to travel around very much, I’m sure you’ve seen and read about a great number of unusual spots in this world. Perhaps you’ve heard your Dad or your Mother or your friends or the people on television or in the movies tell you about the great places they’ve seen and visited.

Don’t stop now—I want you to go a step further, I want you to use your imagination. Try to think of the most beautiful and. the most exciting things you or anyone else could possibly dream of.

Are you still following me? That’s fine, because I haven’t finished yet….

[Message clipped]  View entire message

Ginger SnapsFri, May 15, 9:40 AM (3 days ago)
Catholic Tradition Newsletter Now I want you to think of all the marvelous things you have ever seen yourself, or that anyone else has ever seen. Add to them al
JOSEPH SARACENOSat, May 16, 12:45 PM (2 days ago)
to me

O.K.

On Friday, May 15, 2020, 06:40:40 AM PDT, Ginger Snaps <heavenshocking@gmail.com> wrote:

———- Forwarded message ———
From: Fr Courtney E Krier <tcatholicn@yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, May 15, 2020 at 9:20 AM
Subject: Catholic Tradition News Letter B20: Holy Eucharist, Fifth Sunday after Easter, St Paschal Baylon, Family
To: Fr Courtney Edward Krier <in_his_service@att.net>

Catholic Tradition Newsletter

A weeklypresentation of News, Information, Readings and Commentary for traditional RomanCatholics and Catholic Families remaining faithful to the teaching Magisteriumas held by all faithful Catholics through the centuries.

Vol 13Issue 20                                               Editor: Rev.Fr. Courtney Edward Krier

May 16, 2020

SaintJohn Nepomucene, opn!

1.     What is the HolyEucharist

2.     Fifth Sunday afterEaster

3.     Saint Paschal Baylon

4.     Family and Marriage

5.     Articles and notices

DearReader:

The last several weeks have brought up many topicsthat have extended my commentary and I have neglected to introduce the nextbook that is already being published in sections, Good Morning Boys andGirls. Providing a section for the Family I thought it would be good tohave these sermon/stories for our fathers and mothers to read to theirchildren. It would not only provide—and it is providential since I had plannedit without knowing the State would shut down schools—an opportunity for our parentsto present topics that teach the faith in a practical manner, but at the sametime read it to their children so the children could hear a sermon without itsounding like a sermon, just a short entertaining story. In many large parishesthere would be a Children’s Mass where the priest would give a sermon directedmore toward their age groups and topics surrounding their lives. It may make usnervous now to hear such expressions as a Children’s Mass now that theConciliar Church has transformed the expression into one with the experiencesof seeing a pedophile having all the children around him at the table whilethey parody their Novus Ordo with touches and hugs and balloons and clowns andacrobats along with songs and dances that scandalize their own liberalprogressive members. It must be clear that the Children’s Mass, as it wasunderstood previous to Vatican II, was one which saw the children well-behavedduring a Mass (usually monitored by the Religious Sisters) that was nodifferent than any other Mass except, as I mentioned, the sermon. It was thesame for places where there was a Spanish Mass scheduled, or a German Mass, ora French Mass—everything was the same except for the sermon that was preachedin the language indicated. It should be so today but too many have incorporatedthe Novus Ordo meaning to Catholic expressions. This is one reason for readingCatholic material written prior to Vatican II that uses Catholic terminology ina Catholic sense and for our children also to hear it. Unfortunately too muchof so-called present day Catholic writing translates Catholic wording accordingto the Conciliarists and when someone uses a Catholic expression they arelabeled as Novus Ordo or Modernist—without justification, only ignorance. For manyit legitimizes the Conciliar Church by giving them the right to determine howwe as Catholics can speak and write by somehow saying we cannot use theseterms. Hopefully priests are explaining the Catholic understanding of theterminology without eliminating the terminology or surrendering it to theConciliarists.

With the children home and away from the godless andimmoral public schools, I pray our parents are taking the time to reestablishthemselves as the primary educators in the lives of their children, teachingthem the proper grade level material and not allowing them to fall behind intheir academic formation. It can be a wonderful time to present the material ina Catholic manner without the indoctrination the public schools inject so theycan see that History is History and Natural Science is Natural Science andEnglish grammar is exact so that those who can read are reading what the writerintends them read—not an interpretation or guess like a foreign language. Itwill also show the children that even if the state and school system fail themlike right now, you, as parents, are still there to educate and support them.To help, then, I hope the sermon/stories will be of assistance. May our Lady,Seat of Wisdom, and Saint Joseph, the Carpenter, aid you.

As always, enjoythe readings provided for your benefit.—The Editor

________________

WHAT IS THE HOLY EUCHARIST

By Rev. Courtney EdwardKrier

PART II

Institution

TheInstitution of the Holy Eucharist

Here, also, two aspects should be considered. First,that it indicates something new is beginning that is different from the past.If the washing of feet was already accomplished before sitting at table, havingthe guests rise from the table indicates they have already completed eating themeal—here, the Passover meal. But washing the feet again after indicates eitherthe meal will begin again, or some other significance is implied, and this canbe understood in the exchange between Jesus Christ and Peter: 

And Peter saith to him: Lord, dost thou wash my feet?Jesus answered, and said to him: What I do thou knowest not now; but thoushalt know hereafter. Peter saith to him: Thou shalt never wash my feet.Jesus answered him: If I wash thee not, thou shalt have no part with me.Simon Peter saith to him: Lord, not only my feet, but also my hands and myhead. Jesus saith to him: He that is washed, needeth not but to washhis feet, but is clean wholly. And you are clean, but not all. (John 13:6-10)

Jesus Christ was setting the Apostles aside for thepriesthood of the New Testament, as seen in the Book of Numbers:  Take the Levites out of the midst of thechildren of Israel, and thou shalt purify them, according to this rite: Letthem be sprinkled with the water of purification (Num. 8:6-7) This isconfirmed by His words afterwards: Amen, amen I say to you, he thatreceiveth whomsoever I send, receiveth me; and he that receiveth me, receivethhim that sent me. (John 13:20) And it corresponds to the renewal of thewords of Christ to His Apostles: He said therefore to them again: Peace beto you. As the Father hath sent me, I also send you. (John 20:21; cf. Matt.28:19 and Mark 16:15)

As Christ instituted the New Testament priesthoodduring the Institution of the Holy Eucharist, which is the First Mass, it isalso that the priesthood is bestowed during the Holy Mass with all theceremonies expressing the priest is offering Christ’s Body and Blood as thesacrifice of the New Covenant: Do this for a commemoration of me. (Luke22:19; cf. 1 Cor. 11: 24) With these rites Christ now takes the preparedunleavened bread. One can turn to Meagher for an explanation:

Lying betweenit [the chalice] and the edge of the table was thesilver plate holding the half cake of unleaven bread which had been hidden theAphikoman still covered with a linen cloth. These were not partaken till themaster of the feast had explained the whole ceremonial of the Passover, and wesuppose the Lord pointed out their mystic meanings.

The Aphikoman,”The heavenly bread or manna,” of every Passover, reminded them ofthe desert manna on which their fathers had lived for forty years, and that wasthe fondest memory of the nation. “As Moses brought down manna so theMessiah would bring down a more wonderful food,” [Edersheim, Life ofChrist, I. 176.] “God made manna to descend for them in which was allmanner of tastes. The young tasted bread, the old honey, and the childrenoil.” [Talmud explained by Lightfoot, Hor. Heb. iii. 304.] Teachings hadcome down from the prophets that when the Messiah came he would repeat thewonders of the manna. The Rabbis taught “As the first Saviour, Moses, the delivererfrom Egyptian bondage, caused manna to fall from heaven for Israel, so thesecond Saviour, the Messiah, will also cause manna to descend for them oncemore, for it is written, “There will be abundance of grain in theland.” [Nork, 174] Thus they interpreted the prophecies of the Eucharistthe only-begotten Son was about to fulfil in the Aphikoman and change theshadow into the reality. [See Zanolini, Disputatde Festis Judæorum, Benedict XIV. De Festis Dom. N. Jesus Christi et B. M.Virgin, col. 144, 659, Migne Edition.]

The Passoverrite in the days of Christ, still observed by strict Jews of the Orient, is asfollows. The master of the feast makes a sign to the boy holding the hiddenplate with the Aphikoman, who brings it to him. The master uncovers it, breaksoff a piece which he eats. Then he breaks off a piece for each and lays it onthe guest’s left palm. The guests take the pieces of bread between thumb andindex finger and put them in their mouths. (423-24)

In Scripture one reads:

Saint Matthew

And whilst they were at supper, Jesus took bread, andblessed, and broke: and gave to his disciples, and said: Take ye, and eat. Thisis my body. (Matt. 26:26)

Saint Mark

And whilst they were eating, Jesus took bread; andblessing, broke, and gave to them, and said: Take ye. This is my body. (Mark 14:22)

Saint Luke

And taking bread, he gave thanks, and brake; and gaveto them, saying: This is my body, which is given for you. Do this for acommemoration of me. (Luke 22:19)

Saint Paul:

The Lord Jesus, the same night in which he wasbetrayed, took bread. And giving thanks, broke, and said: Take ye, and eat:this is my body, which shall be delivered for you: this do for thecommemoration of me. (1 Cor. 11:23-24)

Then Christ takes the prepared Chalice. Meagherexplains this cup as follows:

Melchisedech’schalice, the cos-ha-beraehali, [Farrar, ii. 291] “The cup ofblessing,” the fourth cup of wine mixed with water of the Jewishceremonial, covered with a napkin, stands before the Messiah. . . .

The masterdrinks the wine from the chalice, then hands it around to the guests, who alldrink from it. They thus take the bread and wine in memory of Noe, Melchisedechand the proposition bread and wine of the Temple. This ends the feast, and theyare forbidden to eat or drink anything after this, even a dessert is forbidden.The Gospel narrative and Consecration words according to the Roman rite showthat Christ carefully followed the Jewish custom and the Passover rule.

At Passover the master of the feast took his largechalice in his hands, raised it up with a thanksgiving prayer, drank from it,and passed it round to the guests, as a loving cup and a bond of friendshipbetween them. And they all drank as a sign of esteem, friendship, and love ofthe master at whose hospitable table they had celebrated the Passover. TheGospel and the Latin Rite show us that Christ followed this Jewish custom. (424-25)

In Scripture one reads:

Saint Matthew:

And taking the chalice, he gave thanks, and gave tothem, saying: Drink ye all of this. For this is my blood of the new testament,which shall be shed for many unto remission of sins. (Matt. 26:27-28)

Saint Mark

And having taken the chalice, giving thanks, he gaveit to them. And they all drank of it. And he said to them: This is my blood ofthe new testament, which shall be shed for many. (Mark 14: 23-24)

Saint Luke

In like manner the chalice also, after he had supped,saying: This is the chalice, the new testament in my blood, which shall be shedfor you. (Luke 22:20)

Saint Paul

In like manner also the chalice, after he had supped,saying: This chalice is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as often asyou shall drink, for the commemoration of me. (1 Cor. 11: 25)

Croegaert points to the reality of a sacrifice beingoffered by Jesus Christ in the institution of the Holy Eucharist:

The Jews were cognizant of offerings made for sin andknew that blood cannot remit sins unless it is offered in sacrifice. So, too,when the Lord said that his body was given for the Apostles and his blood shedfor many for the remission of sins, he was clearly speaking of a sacrifice. Itis unimportant whether the participles translated “given” and”shed” ( or “poured out”) are translated in the present or(as in the Vulgate account of the consecration of the blood) in the future: ifthey are translated in the present, the sacrificial nature of the eucharisticrite is made obvious, if as future, they emphasize the sacrificial character ofthe cross and the extremely close links by which the eucharistic rite is boundto it.

In consecrating bread and wine separately, Christshowed forth the separation which was to occur on the cross. Indeed, toseparate the blood from the body is to kill. The sacrifice in which the bloodwas shed is, of course, here represented symbolically, but the Eucharist is notmerely a symbol or representation: this rite is sacramental—not only tangible,but also efficacious, making that which it signifies actually present. (cf. op. cit. 19)

Here one mustlook at the scene:

1)      It was after the Passover meal, so all that pertainedto the Passover sacrifice was accomplished:

a)      Luke 22: 20: In like manner the chalice also, afterhe had supped, . . .

b)      John 13:2: And when supper was done, .  . .

c)      1 Cor. 11:25: In like manner also the chalice,after he had supped, . . .

Mentioning thisdetail is to take note it was not part of the Passover ritual. Matthew and Markintroduce the institution during the Supper—but this is easily understood asthe period from when they entered the Cenacle until they departed. Saint Thomaswrites, in commenting on verse 26,

Above, theEvangelist related the celebration of the Pasch; here, the institution of theSacrament of the altar is related. And firstly, the Sacrament is instituted;and secondly, the future scandalizing of the disciples is foretold, where it issaid, Then Jesus saith to them: All you shall be scandalized. Firstly, He doestwo things. The paschal Sacrament is instituted; and secondly, a hymn of thanksgivingis sung, where it is said, And a hymn being said, they went out unto mountOlivet. And about the first point, the Evangelist does two things. Firstly, theinstitution of the Sacrament under the species of bread is related; secondly,the institution of the Sacrament under the species of wine is related , whereit is said, And taking the chalice, he gave thanks, etc. About the first point,he firstly mentions Christ’s actions; and secondly, he mentions Christ’s words,where it is said, Take ye and eat. This is my body. Regarding His actions, fivethings ought to be noted. Firstly, the time is related; secondly, the matter isindicated; thirdly, the blessing is related; fourthly, the breaking is related;and fifthly, the communication, or distribution is related. The time ismentioned when he says, And whilst they were at supper, etc., meaning duringtheir supper, meaning while they were eating. (Com. On Matthew’s Gospel, 858)

2)      The Passover meal consisted of a ritually sacrificedlamb and rituals. The institution of the Holy Eucharist had to have a greatersignificance and would have consisted of rituals, though not noted—as thePassover rituals were also not noted in detail—but found in the rituals handeddown by the Apostles and still preserved in holy Mass.

a)      From the command to observe the Passover (Scriptural)to the ritual of the Passover (Tradition) one sees a prescribed ritualuniversally followed by all in Jerusalem for the Passover before thedestruction of the Temple.

b)      Saint John, in the Apocalypse, provides an oversightof a ritual: I was in the spirit on the Lord’s day . . . (Apoc. 1:10; cf.1:12ff, 4:1ff, and 5:1ff.) Candles, book open, vestments, incense, Sanctusannouncing Canon of Mass, et cetera.

c)      Exodus, chapters 25-30 describe the making and placingof the vestments, lamps, incense and ark but no details of the ritual.

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The SundaySermons of the Great Fathers

M. F. Toal

THE GOSPEL OF THE SUNDAY

John xvi. 23-30

At that time:Jesus said to his disciples: Amen, amen, I say to you: if you ask the Fatheranything in my name, he will give it to you. Hitherto you have not askedanything in my name. Ask, and you shall receive; that your joy may be madefull.

These things Ihave spoken to you in proverbs. The hour cometh, when I will no more speak toyou in proverbs, but will shew you plainly of the Father. In that day you shallask in my name; and I say not to you that I will ask the Father for you: Forthe Father himself loveth you, because you have loved me, and have believedthat I came out from God. I came forth from the Father, and am come into theworld: again I leave the world, and I go to the Father.

His disciples sayto him: Behold, now thou speakest plainly, and speakest no proverb. Now we knowthat thou knowest all things, and thou needest not that any man should askthee. By this we believe that thou camest forth from God.

EXPOSITION FROM THE CATENA AUREA

V. 28. I came forth from the Father, and am comeinto the world . . .

AUGUSTINE, Tr. in John, 102, 6: He came forth fromthe Father, because He is of the substance of the Father. He came into thisworld, for He manifested His Body (which He took from the Virgin) to the world.He left the world by means of a bodily departure, yet not depriving the worldof the support of His Presence: for coming forth from the Father He so came tothe world that He at the same time departed not from His Father (101, 4). Butwe read that Our Lord Jesus Christ was both asked questions and prayed to. Forabout to ascend into heaven He was asked by His Disciples when He would restorethe kingdom of Israel? In heaven He was besought by Stephen to receive hisspirit (Acts vii. 58). And who will venture to say that while yet mortal Hemight be besought, but not when immortal? I believe therefore that what He justsaid: And in that day you shall not ask me anything (v. 23), does not refer tothe time of His Resurrection, but to that time when we shall see him as he is(I John iii). This vision belongs, not to His temporal life, but to theeternal, wherein we shall ask for nothing (101, 6), seek for nothing; for thereshall remain nothing to be desired, nothing hidden to be revealed.

ALCUIN: ThereforeHe says: In the world that is to come you shall not ask me anything, but now,while you linger in this pilgrimage of suffering, if you ask the Father foranything, He will give it to you. Accordingly, he continues and says: Amen,amen, I say to you; if you ask the Father anything in my name, He will give itto you.

AUGUSTINE, Tr. 102 in John 2: That He says anythingis not to be understood as meaning anything whatsoever, but something which hasto do with the obtaining of the life of the blessed; for what is asked for tothe hindering of our salvation is not asked for in the Name of the Saviour. Forwhen He says, In my name, we must understand, not the sound of the letters andsyllables, but what is truly and correctly signified by the sound.

Accordingly, hewho believes regarding Christ that which is not to be thought of concerning theOnly Son of God, does not ask in His Name. But he who believes that which is tobe held regarding Him, he truly asks in His Name, and shall receive what he isseeking; if he seeks what is not opposed to his own eternal welfare. And heshall receive it when it is fitting that He shall receive it. For there arethings which while not denied are yet withheld: to be given in a fitting time.

Likewise weshould correctly understand the words: Hewill give it to you, so that by them those favours are to be understoodwhich relate expressly to those who ask. All the sanctified are beyond doubtheard, when they pray, not for anyone, but for themselves; for it was not saidsimply, that He will give, but that, He will give to you.

(102, 2). Whatfollows: Hitherto you have not askedanything in my name, may be understood in two ways. Either that you havenot asked in My name, because you have not known the Name as it is to be known,or because you have not asked anything; since in comparison with that which youought to have asked for, that must be regarded as nothing for which you didask. Therefore, that they may ask in His Name, not for what is nothing, but forthe fulness of delight, He goes on: Ask,and you shall receive; that your joy may be full. This saying: the fulness of joy: means spiritual notcarnal joy; and it will be full when it is so great that nothing can be addedto it.

AUGUSTINE, De Trin. I, 2: This is the fulness ofour joy, than which there is nothing greater: to enjoy God in the Trinity; inWhose likeness we are made.

AUGUSTINE, Tr. 102 in John 2: Whatsoever thereforethat is asked for which relates to the attainment of this Joy must be asked forin the Name of Christ. The divine mercy shall never disappoint the just whopersevere in the desire of that good. Whatsoever else is asked for, nothing isasked for; not that it is really nothing, but that in comparison with this sogreat joy it is as nothing. Then follows: These things I have spoken to you inproverbs. The hour cometh, when I will no more speak to you in proverbs. Iwould say (102, 3) that the hour of which He is here speaking must beunderstood of the world to come; when we shall behold Him clearly, face to face,as the Apostle says; and that the words: Thesethings I have spoken to you in proverbs, relate to what was later said bythe Apostle: We see now through a glassin a dark manner (I Cor. xiii. 12). I will show you plainly of the Father;for the Father shall be seen through the Son. Neither doth anyone know theFather, but the Son, and he to whom it shall please the Son to reveal him.

GREGORY, Morals 30, 8: He declares that He willspeak openly to us concerning the Father; for by the revelation of His ownmajesty He will show us both the manner in which He came forth, being Equal toHim that begot Him, and the manner in which the Holy Spirit proceeds from ThemBoth.

AUGUSTINE, in John; as above: But this meaningappears to hamper what follows: In that day you shall ask in my name: for in the world to come what shall we askfor, since our desire is already satisfied with good things (Ps. cii. 5)?For to ask for anything is a sign of need. (102, 4). It remains therefore thatJesus is to be understood as about to change His Disciples from being carnal oranimal-minded into spiritual men. A carnal minded man whatever he shall hearconcerning the nature of God will understand it in a bodily sense; as he cannotunderstand It as being other than body (though vast, or immense, or shining, oras beautiful). And so whatever words of wisdom are spoken regarding thisincorporeal and unchangeable Substance are proverbs to him; not that he regardsthem as proverbs, but he thinks of them in the manner of those who are wont tohear proverbs: as not understanding them.

But when he hasbecome spiritual minded he begins to see into all things; though in this lifehe sees as through a glass, and only in part; yet he perceives through nobodily sense, through no imaginative concept, but by means of a most certainknowledge of his mind understands that God is not body but spirit. And the sonspeaking so plainly of the Father, it is evident that He who speaks is of thesame Substance. Now they who pray, pray in His Name, for by the sound of thatName they mean only the Reality called by this Name. They can think within themthat Our Lord Jesus Christ as man intercedes for us, and as God, together withthe Father, receives our prayer. I think He implies this when He says: And I say not to you, that I will ask thefather for you. Only the eye of a mind that is spiritual can rise to seehow it is the son will not ask the father, but that father and son togetherreceive the prayers of those who pray to them.

V. 29. His disciples say to him: behold now thouspeakest plainly . . .

CHRYSOSTOM, asabove: Because this especially breathed new life into them: that they werefriends of the Father: they thereupon declare they are certain that He knowsall things. Now, they say, thou speakest plainly, and speakest no proverb.AUGUSTINE, 103: But since that hour in which He shall speak to them withoutproverbs was yet to come, and only promised, why do they say this, if notbecause the things He knows are to them, who understand them not, still asproverbs; and so little do they understand that they not even see that they donot understand?

V. 30. Now weknow that thou knowest all things . . .

CHRYSOSTOM, Hom.78, 2: Since His words answer that which was in their minds, they continue: Nowwe know that thou knowest all things. See how imperfect they were; after seeingso many and such great wonders, they exclaim: Now we know . . . sayingit too as though conferring a reward on Him. And thou needest not that any manshould ask thee; that is, without hearing from us Thou dost know what troublesus, and Thou hast given peace to our hearts, telling us that the Father lovesus.

AUGUSTINE, 103,2: What does it mean that they should say to Him Whom they believed knew allthings: Thou needest not that any man should ask thee, when they shouldrather have said: Thou needest not to ask any man? Both of which things in facttook place; namely, that the Lord both asked questions, and was asked them. Butthis is readily explained: for this was for the benefit, not of Him, but ofthem, whom He questions and by whom He was Himself questioned. For Hequestioned them, not that He might learn from them, but rather that He mightteach them; and they who questioned Him, desiring to learn something from Him,had need to learn certain things from Him Who knew all things. Neither did Heneed to learn, by their question, that which each wished to learn from Him; forbefore He was questioned He had known the wish of the questioner. To foreknowthe thoughts of men was no great thing for the Lord, but to the newborn (inChrist) it was a great wonder; who go on to add: By this we believe thatthou camest forth from God.

HILARY, TheTrinity, 6; 34: Because of this they believe that He has come forth from God,namely: that He does the things which only God may do. For when the Lord hadsaid that He both came forth from God, and that, from the Father He had comeinto this world, they showed no astonishment at this; for they had frequentlyheard it before. Accordingly they do not add: And have come from the Fatherinto the world. For they knew already that He was sent by God. But they did notyet know that He came forth from the Father.

Understandingnow, because of these words, they then for the first time, when they declarethat He now spoke to them without proverbs, begin to tum their minds towardsthis ineffable mystery of the birth of the Son (par. 35). For not after themanner of a human bringing-forth is God born of God; His is rather a comingforth from God than a bringing forth. He is One from the One; not a portion,not a falling away; it is not a diminution, not an offshoot, not a stretchingforth, not an infirmity, but the birth of a living substance from a livingsubstance. It is God coming forth from God; not a creature elected to the nameof God. He did not, from nothing, begin to be; but came forth from What wasforever; and to have come forth means birth, not beginning.

AUGUSTINE, 103,2: Lastly He reminds them of their age with regard to the inward man: that itwas as yet young and tender.

———————–

MAY 17

St. Paschal Baylon, Confessor

1. St. Paschal was born of deeplyreligious parents, in Spain, May 16, 1540. At an early age the boy gaveevidence of great piety, especially in his devotion to the Holy Eucharist. Hisgreatest joy was to be carried by his mother to Mass. Before he could walk, hesometimes crawled on all fours to the Church and climbed up to the altar inorder to be near the Savior. At seven he began herding his father’s sheep and,since he could not afford to go to school, he carried a book to the pasture andspent his leisure hours at learning to read and write. Eventually the boy wasable to read books; but then, he was sent to work away from home, where he hadto contend with the bad example of fellow shepherds. Meanwhile, Paschal feltdrawn to the religious state. When he was eighteen he applied for admission toa Franciscan monastery near Valencia. He was rejected and sent to tend thesheep of a neighbor. This was done, evidently, to try his vocation, for in1564, he was given the habit of a brother. He strove to live a perfect, holylife and continued his boyhood devotion to Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. Hedied on May 17, 1592; he was beatified in 1618, was canonized in 1690, and, in1897 Pope Leo XIII declared him the heavenly patron of all Eucharisticsocieties.

2. “I give thee praise that thouhast hidden all this from the wise and the prudent, and revealed it to littlechildren” (Matt. 11:25). It seems that God always chooses little, unlikelyinstruments to accomplish great works. He wants to show that He is the almightyLord, so that no man shall boast before Him. “Lifting up the poor from the dusthe lay in, raising the beggar out of his dung-hill, to find him a place amongthe princes. . .” (Ps. 112:7). Again, “He has exalted the lowly” (Magnificat;Luke 1:52). The poor, unlettered shepherd bore patiently the trial of beingrefused the religious habit and having to work at his humble occupation for sixmore years. Likewise, as a religious, he found ample occasion for the exerciseof humility under difficult commands and correction, not to mention unkindsuspicions and accusations. But his calm, humble submissiveness was rewardedwith heavenly favors. For example, utterly ignorant of theological learning, hecould grasp the deepest mysteries of faith and give opinions about dogmatictreatises, much to the astonishment of the greatest theologians of his time.Besides, he enjoyed the gift of prophecy; he could read hearts; he obtainedcures. Greatest of his gifts was the grace of prayer. In his shepherd days helived a hermit’s life, sanctified by prayer; he beheld divine truths in momentsof ecstasy. Cold weather, ice, and snow did not prevent him from spending nighthours in contemplation. Thus did God exalt the humble Brother. When, in view ofhis talents, superiors suggested that he study for the priesthood, Paschalexpressed his desire to remain as he was, feeling himself, like St. Francis,unworthy of the priestly dignity.

“O God, who didst adorn Thy blessedconfessor Paschal with a marvelous love for the sacred mysteries of Thy bodyand blood . . .” (Collect). Even before he entered the monastery, Paschal’sheart glowed with love for the Eucharistic Lord. Now, as doorkeeper, he foundopportunity for frequent visits to the church. Interruptions of duty failed tointerrupt his spirit of recollection and adoration. Very early in the morning,he could be found kneeling for hours, with outstretched arms, before thetabernacle. Occasionally he was so powerfully drawn to contemplation of theEucharistic mystery that his body rose from the floor. This same spiritprompted him, too, to serve as many as eight Holy Masses in one morning. It wasthis constant, loving realization of the Mystery of Love that supported the Saintat all times and in all circumstances. On one occasion, when he was travelingto a monastery in France, Huguenots mistreated and reviled him and even threwstones at him. When he begged food, people suspected him of being a spy, beathim, and then jailed him. This appeared to be the end for him, but, freedmiraculously, he continued his journey, enduring new insults on the way.

Finally, some Huguenots resorted todifferent tactics. They questioned: “Do you believe that God is present in theSacrament that you consecrate at Mass?” Brother replied: “Yes, I do believethat; and I loudly proclaim that God is truly and substantially present underthe appearance of bread.” More mistreatment followed, and, no doubt, Paschal’sdesire to become a martyr of the Eucharist would have been fulfilled, had notGod wonderfully protected him. All the stones aimed at his head missed theirmark; only one struck his left shoulder and crushed the bones, leaving himcrippled for life. After two months he reached his monastery, stilldisappointed at not having been called upon to give his life for his faith inthe divine presence. It is claimed that when he lay as a corpse before thealtar, he opened his eyes for a moment at the consecration, to adore Hissacrificed Lord for a last time. St. Paschal’s strong faith in, and love forthe Holy Eucharist should be an inspiration to all.

3. From his fervent devotion to theEucharistic Savior, St. Paschal gained perfection of virtue; complete freedomfrom all sin; love for poverty; virginity, chastity; humility, renunciation andprayer. His life showed forth perfect love of God and neighbor. “Tell me withwhom you associate, and I will tell you who you are.” Do not we have the sameSavior in the tabernacle, in the Holy Sacrifice, in Holy Communion? And yet—!

The Church possesses no greater,holier, or more wonderful treasure than the Blessed Sacrament. In it, she hasthe most remarkable, the greatest gift of God—God Himself, the source andauthor of all grace and holiness—Jesus Christ. If thou didst know the Gift ofGod! (cf. John 4: 10).

Collect: O God, who didst adorn Thy blessed confessor Paschal with amarvelous love for the sacred mysteries of Thy body and blood, grant us thisfavor: that we may find the same spiritual fulfillment as he found in thisdivine banquet. Amen. (Benedict Baur)

_____________________

Good Morning,

Boys and Girls!

            REV. THOMAS J. HOSTY, M.A., S.T.B.

(1952)

GOD’S HOME

GOOD MORNING, BOYS AND GIRLS!

The last time I spoke to you, I spent quite a bit oftime in describing God’s jail to you. I hope you’ll never forget what aterrible place it is. I pray every day, too, that none of us will ever gothere. But as long as I told you about God’s jail, I think that it’s only fairto tell you about God’s home. Do you know why? Because He has invited every oneof us to be His guests there, after we die. And we’re not invited for just acouple of days, or for a week or two. We’re invited to stay there forever!

I suppose there isn’t a single one here this morning,who doesn’t know the name of God’s home. Just to make sure, though, let me askone of you what you think God’s home is.

No, it isn’t the church. It’s true, however, that Hedoes stay there, in the tabernacle, under what looks like a little piece ofbread. But the church isn’t His real home. In His real home, He isn’t hidingunder the appearance of bread or wine. You can see Him the way He actuallylooks.

I’ll give you a chance to make another guess. What orwhere is God’s home?

No, it isn’t Nazareth, either—but you’re getting a lotcloser to the truth. I admit that Nazareth was our Lord’s home for a while,when He lived on this earth. But after He left this earth, He left Nazareth,too. When I speak of God’s home, I mean the place where God lives, and isactually seen and worshiped by all the angels and saints. To put it more simplystill, I mean the place where God lives forever.

I knew if I gave you enough hints, you’d all know theanswer. Yes, God’s true home is the place we call heaven.

Boys and girls, heaven is so wonderful a place that Ican hardly begin to describe it, but I’ll make an effort, anyway. Try topicture all the beautiful things you have seen in your lifetime. Maybe, on yourvacation, you were lucky enough to visit the Grand Canyon or the RockyMountains or Niagara Falls, In case you haven’t been fortunate enough to travelaround very much, I’m sure you’ve seen and read about a great number of unusualspots in this world. Perhaps you’ve heard your Dad or your Mother or yourfriends or the people on television or in the movies tell you about the greatplaces they’ve seen and visited.

Don’t stop now—I want you to go a step further, I wantyou to use your imagination. Try to think of the most beautiful and. the mostexciting things you or anyone else could possibly dream of.

Are you still following me? That’s fine, because Ihaven’t finished yet.

Now I want you to think of all the marvelous thingsyou have ever seen yourself, or that anyone else has ever seen. Add to them allthe unusual things you have ever read or heard about. Next, I want you to joinall of them with the most exciting thoughts or dreams you have ever had in yourlife. Suppose, then, that by a miracle you were able to put all those wonderfulthings together—you’d still have only the faintest idea of how enchantingheaven is actually going to be!

I know what some of you are thinking, right now.”Father sure has some imagination, hasn’t he? Wouldn’t it be really swell,though, if only a part of what he said would turn out to be right?”

Boys and girls, I’ve saved the best part of thislittle sermon until now. Do you know what the best part of it all is? I haven’texaggerated a single thing! I only repeated, in other words, what St. Paul saidabout heaven, after God gave him a chance to look at it for a very short time.Just to be sure that there aren’t any “doubting Thomases” among you,let me quote the exact words which St. Paul used in describing his vision ofheaven: “Eye has not seen, nor ear heard, neither has it entered into theheart of man, what things God has prepared for those who love Him.”

Just think—there isn’t a single boy or girl in thiswhole church, who hasn’t received a special invitation from our Lord to staywith Him, in His home, forever, after they die! There are so many things thatall of us wish we had or could get on this earth. The trouble is, no one evergets all the things he would like to have, in this life. But there will beabsolutely no excuse if you don’t receive all the things you need to make youhappy, after you die. If you don’t accept God’s invitation to be His guest inHis home after you die, you’ll have no one to blame but yourself. Of course, ifyou love other people or other things more than you love God, while you arestill on this earth, you can hardly be angry at God for not wanting you as Hisguest, after you die. His home is filled only with His friends who loved Himmore than anything else on earth.

Before I finish this talk, let me answer one morequestion which I know is in your minds. In fact, I can almost read it in yourfaces. I know that you all want to go to God’s home, after you die, but whatyou’re wondering about is this—How can I show my love for God? How can I provethat I am His friend, if I can’t even see Him now, except under the appearanceof a little piece of bread, which I am not even allowed to touch with my hands?

Our blessed Lord knew that not only you, but all ofhis followers would want a clear answer to those very same questions—and so Hegave us the answer. “If you love ME,” He said, “keep theCommandments!” That’s the test, boys and girls. If you don’t keep God’scommandments, don’t expect to spend your eternity in His home, because you’renot His friend!

THE TOP OFTHE MORNING

GOOD MORNING, BOYS AND GIRLS!

Do you know, I almost said, “The top of themornin’ to you all.” Who can guess why I almost made that remark? Sureenough! Because today’s St. Patrick’s day. He is the patron saint of the Irish,and “the top of the mornin’ ” is a common greeting among the Irishpeople. Just in case someone should happen to salute you that way today,remember that the right answer to that wish is to say, “And the rest ofthe day to yourself!”

By the way, you’ll notice that a great number of peoplewill be wearing shamrocks today; in fact, I see that quite a few of you havethem on your coats and dresses. Do you know why a smart Irish man or womanwears a shamrock? Well, let me tell you. When St. Patrick wanted to explain themystery of the Blessed Trinity, he pulled a shamrock out of the ground. (Ashamrock looks a great deal like a three-leaf clover.) Then he said, “Themystery of the Blessed Trinity is like this shamrock; just as there are threeleaves, but only one stem and only one shamrock, so in God there are threedivine Persons, but only one divine Nature, and only one God!”

 But let’s getback to St. Patrick’s day. Of course, we all know that practically everyone whois Irish, either by birth (as my mother and father were), or by descent (as agood number of the people in this parish are), will celebrate today. I’m sorryto say, though, that not all of them will celebrate in the way good St. Patrickwould want them to. I’m certain that he would not object to parties and dancesand dinners in his honor; but surely he would expect every Irishman, worthy ofthe name, if it were at all possible, to begin the day by worshiping AlmightyGod at the Sacrifice of the Mass. He would expect, too, that all the Irish,both the native born and those of Irish ancestry, would thank the Lord for allthe graces He gave to their patron saint—those graces which St. Patrick used soperfectly for the benefit of the “island of Saints and scholars,” asIreland is affectionately known.

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